Before You Buy That New Home: Three Big Plumbing Questions

Getting into a new home can be an exhilarating experience. The only problem is that in the excitement of getting there, a person can forget to ask about the basics of home infrastructure namely plumbing and sewage. Before you commit to a home and move in, you want to ask three important questions.

1. What condition is the sewer line in?
In any home, if the waste flows smoothly from your house to the main sewer maintained by your city or waste service, the sewer line should be in good condition. If you fail to ask, the repairs or replacements, even minor ones, can cost thousands of dollars. Before you buy in, make sure all sewer lines flow uninterrupted. If you know of any problem, make sure the current owners either repair it or bear the necessary costs of repair.

2. Are there any leakage problems?
In the stress of moving into a new home, even a minor leak a dripping faucet or running toilet can spike your irritation levels. And no new homeowner needs more of that. Just as no new homeowner wants the water bill that comes with the leaks, avoidable expenses easily nipped by hiring a licensed professional plumber.  For any leakage undetected and identified later on, any licensed and trusted plumber can locate the root problem and help you solve it.

3. How’s the water heater?
Before you sign for your new home, ask about the condition of the water
heater:

  • What’s its present state? Good?
  • How old is it?
  • When was its last maintenance?

A reliable seller can give you maintenance records to support any claims
made by the owner. A well-maintained water heater is not just an asset, it’s a necessity. A damaged or falling unit is also a money drain. If the water heater is damaged or needs to be replaced, ask your realtor or seller to put the expense in the final sales proceeds. Remember: A reliable owner will give you maintenance records to back up any claims.

Thinking about a tankless water heater?
Are you interested in the benefits and endless possibilities of a tankless water heater? It may be time to upgrade your typical water heater. Since 1903, in Dallas and surrounding areas, Dallas Plumbing Company has been a trusted and reliable name for all your heating and air conditioning needs. We offer a complete range of residential and commercial water heating services to at competitive prices and with no compromise on quality. Check out our range of plumbing and heating and other services.

PLUMBING ALERT: PIPE FREEZE PREVENTION

Burst Pipes Can Be an Expensive Mess to Clean Up and Easy to Avoid

When outside temperatures hit 32 degrees Fahrenheit or below, you want to check and protect all the water pipes in your house. Take nothing for granted. Twenty degrees Fahrenheit is known as the red-alert level when water in pipes can freeze, create pressure and burst its metal or plastic.

If your area is expecting a freeze, use this checklist to help warm your pipes and protect your pocketbook.

  1. Drip your indoor faucets.

“Drip” means you turn faucets on just enough to stay on, given that pipes can freeze overnight. Even at a trickle, the moving water helps prevent pipe problems.

Note that pipes don’t always burst when they are freezing or frozen. Damage can come in the pressure caused as thawed water begins again to rush through the pipe.

  • Open the cabinet doors under your sink.

While you stand at the kitchen or bathroom sink to set a controlled drip, reach down and open the doors below. For pipes near an outside wall, this is especially important. As much as possible, invite room-temperature air to flow in and around your pipes.

  • Safeguard the hose bibs exposed to the outside.

A hose bib is the outdoor water tap on the outside of your home. Locate your hose bib, disconnect any hoses from it, and shut off or drain the water from the faucet. Drain the water from the hose. Inside your home or crawl space, turn off any valve that supplies water just to the outdoor faucets. As with the kitchen and bathroom faucets, turn the handles of the hose bib to drip, and place insulating covers over them.

Long term, consider a frost-resistant outdoor spigot.

  • Open all your heat registers.

As you learned early in your science class, hot air rises and cold air falls. When you open the lower registers and close the top ones, you invite the hot air to stay and the cold air to go. Cold air is heavier and flows down to the lower register.

  • Cover your exposed pipes.

Every exposed pipe in winter is trouble waiting to happen. Insulate your outside pipes with pipe wrap or foam pipe sleeves available at most hardware stores. Insulate the gaps where pipes enter the walls.

  • Caulk outside pipes.

Use calk or canned spray foam to cover outdoor pipes and seal the spaces where they go through walls. While you’re at it, check for exposed piping in un-insulated spaces such as a crawlspace, attic, outside walls, etc. For larger holes, use a rubber gasket.

  • Turn on the heat in unoccupied units.  

The enemy is cold. Even in currently unused units, rooms or bathrooms, make sure the heat is high enough to resist freezing.